Course Descriptions

Geography, Faculty of Arts and Sciences

GEOG: Geography

GEOG 108 (3) Introduction to Physical Geography I
Principles and processes that govern the functions of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Interactions between these environmental systems and human activity. [3-2-0]
GEOG 109 (3) Introduction to Physical Geography II
Principles and processes that govern the functions of the Earth's lithosphere and terrestrial geomorphology. Interactions between the lithospheric system and human activity. [3-2-0]
GEOG 128 (3) Human Geography: Space, Place, and Community
Critical introduction to the study and application of the major themes of human geography, including historical, regional, urban, social, and cultural geographies. Draws upon a range of geographic research methods to investigate geographic phenomena, especially human-environment relations. Not for Science credit. [3-0-0]
GEOG 129 (3) Human Geography: Resources, Development, and Society
Introduction to concepts, methods, modes of explanation, and recent critical changes in the study of human geography. Interpretation and explanation of geographic variations arising within contexts of rapidly changing cultural, demographic, economic, political, and social phenomena and their relationship to the environment. Not for Science credit. [3-0-0]
GEOG 200 (3) Atmospheric Environments
Physical principles underlying weather and climates. Thermal, moisture, and wind climates at scales from valleys to the globe. Daily weather, air pollution, global change. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 200 or EESC 212. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 108 and GEOG 109; or (b) two of EESC 101, EESC 111, EESC 121 or (c) successful completion of first-year Science.
Equivalency: EESC 212.
GEOG 205 (3) Introduction to Hydrology
Principles of hydrology at site, watershed, and regional scales. Techniques of measurement and analysis. Emphasizes surface water hydrology of western North America. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 205 or EESC 205. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 108 and GEOG 109; or (b) two of EESC 101, EESC 111, EESC 121 or (c) successful completion of first-year Science.
Equivalency: EESC 205.
GEOG 207 (3) Introduction to Biogeography
Geographical ecology emphasizing species distributions, abiotic-biotic interactions, disturbance and vegetation response, and human impacts across spatial scales. Vegetation sampling and analysis methods. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 108 and GEOG 109; or (b) BIOL 116 and BIOL 125; or (c) BIOL 117 and BIOL 122; or (d) EESC 111 and EESC 121.
GEOG 213 (3) Introduction to Environmental Issues
Introduction to the major environmental issues facing this planet. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 213, EESC 101, SUST 100. [3-0-1]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 111, EESC 121, GEOG 108, GEOG 109, GEOG 128, GEOG 129.
GEOG 217 (3) Regional Geography of British Columbia
The development of a definition of contemporary regional geography; regional settlement patterns and their formative factors; the regional nature of resources; economic regions, networks, and communications; urban regions and regional districts in BC; an inquiry into the regional nature of the south central interior of BC. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: GEOG 128.
GEOG 221 (3) Food Systems I: System Thinking
In-depth look at food systems, including food production, processing, distribution, consumption and waste. Required field trips will be organized that explore both the value chain of a farm and its related food industry; and the food system of a large institution. Students must arrange own transportation to/from Kelowna-area field location. Credit will be granted for only one of FDSY 221 and GEOG 221. (1.5-0-1.5)
GEOG 222 (3) Geomorphology
Landform assemblages and processes of landscape evolution on Earth. Fundamental concepts, including system equilibrium, thresholds, complex response to external forces, and scale dependency, with application to mountains, rivers, coasts, and glaciated terrain. Laboratory exercises require field work in lab time. Required one-day, weekend trip. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 222 or EESC 222. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 108 and GEOG 109; or (b) MATH 100 and EESC 111 or (c) MATH 100 and 6 credits of first-year lab science.
Equivalency: EESC 222.
GEOG 250 (3) Introduction to Urban Geography
Examination of how cities emerge, function, and change. Introduces the city in its historical and geographical perspective, focusing on the complex relationship between economic, political, cultural, and environmental phenomena. Students will complete fieldwork projects examining these urban processes at work. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: GEOG 128.
GEOG 255 (3) Space and Culture
Provides tools to undertake analyses of relationships between culture, politics, and everyday life. Themes will be selected from: a history of Anglo-American cultural geography, cultural studies and geography, cultural politics, sexuality and space, gender and geography, axes of power, and marginalization. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129.
GEOG 261 (3) Economic Geography
Analysis of structure/dynamics of economic landscapes; theories of location, distribution, and interactions associated with material production and consumption. Discussion themes selected from: distribution phenomena within context of social systems; agricultural systems and land use; industrial landscape formation; consumer behaviour, and spatial structure of service activities.
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129.
GEOG 265 (3) Tourism and Recreation Geography
Regional analysis of geographic dimensions of tourism and recreation. Specific reference to the Canadian experience. Spatial distribution of activities and resources, interrelationships of tourism and recreation with the physical and human environment. Implications of existing and potential supplies/demands, challenges of planning and managing resources. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129.
GEOG 271 (3) Geographic Data Analysis
Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical analysis in geography and Earth sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary probability, statistics for spatial analysis, hypotheses testing, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: 6 credits of 100- or 200-level courses in GEOG or EESC.
GEOG 272 (3) Cartography and Remote Sensing
Cartographic skills and interpretation of remotely-sensed data for geographical applications. Themes include: history of cartography; map scale; projections; types of maps; map interpretation; map making; manipulating cartographic data; interpreting aerial photographs and satellite imagery; integrating maps, remotely sensed data, and geographic information systems. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 111, GEOG 109, GEOG 128.
GEOG 290 (3) Introduction to the Geography of Canada
Selected topics in human geography focusing on the regional distribution of natural resources, population, urban systems, and economic activities. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: none.
GEOG 301 (3) Mechanisms of Global Change
Natural variability of climatic and environmental processes occurring at geological, historical, and contemporary timescales. Data derivation and analysis methods. Environmental changes affecting human activities. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 108 and one of EESC 205, EESC 222, GEOG 205, GEOG 222; or (b) one of EESC 212, GEOG 200. Third-year standing.
GEOG 307 (3) Advanced Biogeography
Present distribution and diversity of plants and animals; factors underlying the development of modern biogeographic realms; dispersal, colonization, and invasion; prehistoric and modern evolution and extinction; biodiversity; island biogeography; conservation biogeography. [3-0-1]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 207 or (b) BIOL 201.
GEOG 310 (3) Environment and Resources
Concepts of environment and resource; the role of physical geography in understanding the interaction of humans and the environment; introduction to the management of environment-resource systems. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: Two of EESC 205, EESC 212, EESC 222, GEOG 108, GEOG 109, GEOG 200, GEOG 205, GEOG 222. Third-year standing.
GEOG 314 (3) Environmental Impact Assessment: Process, Regulation and Administration
Legal, administrative and project management aspects of environmental impact assessment (EIA). EIA regulations, processes and systems. Assessment approaches and methods for cumulative effects, social/economic impacts, strategic and regional assessment, risk assessment and public participation. Canadian federal, territorial and provincial EIA systems. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 314 or EESC 314 [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) 6 credits of EESC or (b) 6 credits of GEOG. Third-year standing.
Equivalency: EESC 314.
GEOG 316 (3) Geography of Natural Hazards
The role of physical and biological hazards, human ecology, environmental perception and world social and political order in explaining the risk of natural disasters. Assessment of acceptable risk, disaster relief and reconstruction, and contrasts between developed and developing nations. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: Either (a) GEOG 108 and GEOG 109; or (b) two of EESC 111, EESC 205, EESC 212, EESC 222, GEOG 200, GEOG 205, GEOG 222. Third-year standing.
GEOG 317 (3) The Physical Environment of British Columbia
The biophysical processes that are shaping and have shaped B.C. Characteristic associations between landforms, climate, soil, and vegetation; biophysical constraints on air, land, and water use. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 205, EESC 212, EESC 222, GEOG 200, GEOG 205, GEOG 222. Third-year standing.
GEOG 318 (3) Rural Geographies
Geographic perspectives in contemporary rural geography. Specific attention is given to social and environmental change, conflict and sustainability in Canadian and global contexts. Themes include transformations in the use of rural resources in agricultural, food, migration, and tourism production and consumption. Students are required to participate in short field trips and must arrange own transportation to/from sites within the Okanagan. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 341 (3) Quaternary Paleoecology and Environmental Change
Recent natural and anthropogenic environmental changes interpreted from paleoecological records, with an emphasis on Quaternary micropaleontology. Impacts of environmental changes on North American terrestrial and aquatic communities. Students are expected to participate in a one-day weekend field trip. Credit will be granted for only one of EESC 341 or GEOG 341. [3-3*-0]
Prerequisite: One of CHEM 111, CHEM 121. Third-year standing.
Equivalency: EESC 341.
GEOG 351 (3) Urban Social Geography
Introduction to the social geographies of cities. Draws on critical social and cultural theories. Gentrification, racialization in the city, gendered spaces, class segregation, urban form, and cultural geographies of urban life. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 353 (3) Geographies of Migration and Settlement
Theoretical and applied perspectives on international migration and settlement. Analysis of international regimes regulating migration, changes in global demographies, immigration policies of nation states, international migration patterns, settlement policies and outcomes. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 354 (3) Urban Canada: Growth, Form, and Structure
Patterns and processes of urban growth, spatial structure and organization of the Canadian city, land development and suburbanization, urban core densification, inner city revitalization, consumption and production spheres, quality of life. Emphasis will be on medium-sized cities. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 356 (3) Stratigraphy and Sedimentology
Origin, classification and interpretation of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Weathering, erosion, transportation, sedimentation, and lithification of clastic materials. Non-clastic sediments. Sedimentary environments, facies and stratigraphic methods. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 356 or EESC 356. [2-2-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 121, EESC 222, GEOG 222.
Equivalency: EESC 356.
GEOG 358 (3) Gender, Place, and Culture
Examination of the ways in which genders and geographies are mutually constituted. Exploration of the relationship between socially constructed gender relations and geographic concepts of culture, space, place, nature, and landscape. Gendered nature of everyday space, work, education, and the natural environment. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 359 (3) Culture, Space, and Politics
Focuses on the cultural turn in geography. Draws upon recent critical theories from cultural studies and cultural geography. Examines the cultural politics of everyday spaces and places. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 365 (3) Parks and Outdoor Recreation
Geographic dimensions of parks and outdoor recreation are examined in urban and rural environments. Understanding parks evolution includes focus on the location, distribution, and site capability of parks and recreational resources, including application of ecological, amenity resource, and management models of parks and outdoor recreational facilities. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 367 (3) Energy Resources Management
Key energy systems and resources management from both global and Canadian perspectives. Supplies, distribution, consumption, resilience and sustainability of energy resources. Alternative energy sources, conventional and unconventional fossil fuels, energy production and delivery systems. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 367 or EESC 367. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: One of GEOG 108, GEOG 129, EESC 101, EESC 111. Third-year standing
Equivalency: EESC 367.
GEOG 370 (3) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Types of spatial data; projections and coordinate systems; GIS data structures; interpretation and analysis of geographic data; applications of GIS; geospatial visualization; GIS modeling. ESRI ArcGIS software fundamentals are learned through hands-on tutorials, assignments, and a term project. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: One of APSC 254, BIOL 202, GEOG 271, GEOG 272, PSYO 271, STAT 121, STAT 230.
GEOG 371 (3) Research Strategies in Human Geography
Formulating a research problem and selecting an appropriate research strategy. Research strategies range from social scientific survey methods to ethnography. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 377 (3) Research Strategies in Physical Geography
Theoretical frameworks and techniques. Formulation of research questions, research design, data collection, field observation and measurement, data analysis, sources of error, and presentation of results. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 108, GEOG 109 and one of EESC 205, EESC 212, EESC 222, GEOG 200, GEOG 205, GEOG 222, GEOG 271. Third-year standing.
GEOG 380 (3) Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science I
Spatial data representation; raster and vector models; spatial database structure; coordinate reference frames and projections; spatial statistics; metadata and data standards; associated technologies and data sources. Laboratory exercises require ArcGIS. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 370, GEOG 380 or EESC 380. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: Third-year standing.
Equivalency: EESC 380.
GEOG 381 (3) Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science II
GIS, remote sensing, GPS; geostatistics, spatial analysis and neighbourhood analysis; visualization, 3D rendering, and animation; principles of geocoding; online mapping and open-source GIS; applied project and workflow management. Laboratory exercises require ArcGIS. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 370, GEOG 381 or EESC 381 [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 380, GEOG 380.
Equivalency: EESC 381.
GEOG 413 (3) Mountain Environments
Mountain environments from a geoecological perspective. Origins of mountains and their weather/climate, hydrology, geomorphology, and biogeography. Applications and limitations of geoecology for understanding mountain environments as human habitats. Case studies include mountain regions throughout the world. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 205, EESC 212, EESC 222, GEOG 200, GEOG 205, GEOG 213, GEOG 222 and one of GEOG 310, GEOG 316, GEOG 317, GEOG 365, GEOG 377. Third-year standing.
GEOG 414 (3) Applied Climatology
Microclimatology and synoptic climatology, Earth-atmosphere interactions, and climatic impacts on human activities. Energy and mass transfers at Earth's surface; boundary layer climatology and its applications to airflow and pollution dispersion, climate modelling, general circulation models. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 212, GEOG 200 and one of GEOG 301, GEOG 310, GEOG 377. Third-year standing.
GEOG 416 (3) Applied Management of Mountain Hazards
Develop an understanding of mountain hazards and approaches to their management, and foster a critical understanding of the contributions made to the field by other earth sciences. Hazards covered include snow avalanches, debris flows, floods, rock avalanches, and hazards of tectonically active mountains. The normal format of this course is as field course at a facility in the Canadian Cordillera. The alternative format is as a regular semester course. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 108, GEOG 109, GEOG 316 and third-year standing.
GEOG 421 (3) Geography of Food Systems
Contemporary issues in food systems, their relation to nutritional health, and social, cultural, economic, and environmental sustainability. Case studies illustrate different components (from production to consumption) and scales (from community to global). Field trip required. [2-0-1]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 422 (3) Fluvial Geomorphology
Geomorphic forms and processes within and along streams and rivers; flow hydraulics; sediment transport and bedform mechanics; hydraulic geometry; channel and floodplain dynamics; sediment yield; river habitat and stream rehabilitation. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 422 or EESC 422. [3-0-1]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 222, GEOG 222, APSC 253.
Equivalency: EESC 422.
GEOG 423 (3) Development of Environmental Thought
An examination of attitudes that have influenced land use and environmental change in the past and present. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 425 (3) Feminist Geographies of (Un)Belonging
Transnational and decolonizing feminist approaches to the geography of power as manifested through contemporary political identities. Focus on relationships between state-mediated categories of (un)belonging such as 'citizen', 'migrant', 'refugee', 'aboriginal', and 'illegal'. Emphasis on borders, border-identities, and multicultural/settler societies such as Australia, Israel, Canada and the United States. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 425 or GWST 425. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: One of GEOG 358, GWST 110, and third-year standing.
Equivalency: GWST 425.
GEOG 427 (3) NeoGeography
Explores the development of NeoGeography and the geoweb: its relationship to geographic theories and concepts; its changing role in influencing the way in which we understand our relationship to space, place and the world around us. [2-0-1]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 429 (3) Sexuality and Space
Interdisciplinary examination of the relationships between gender, sexuality, space, and place. Focus on social investments in race, sexuality, gender, (dis)ability, and citizenship as spatial technologies of belonging and power. Emphasis on queer and critical gender studies approaches to the subfield of cultural geography. Credit will be granted for only one of GWST 429 or GEOG 429. [0-0-3]
Prerequisite: One of GWST 223, GWST 216, GEOG 358 and third-year standing.
Equivalency: GWST 429.
GEOG 431 (3) Resource Management Policy and Practice
Contemporary issues in resource and environmental management including decision-making theory and real-world processes at the policy and field levels. Case studies illustrate stakeholder behaviours from conflict to co-operation. Focus on the Okanagan. [1-0-2]
Prerequisite: One of GEOG 128, GEOG 129, GEOG 310 and third-year standing.
GEOG 434 (3) Geography of Tourism Development
Implications, character, and problems of existing and potential tourism resources. Concepts of tourism supply, demand, and impacts are considered and applied to the Okanagan Valley. Nature and significance of tourism; tourism resources; demands for tourism; economic, environmental, social, and cultural impacts of tourism. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 435 (3) Wine Geographies
Geographical expressions and processes of wine, viniculture, and viticulture. Appellation and terroir frame investigation of the nature-human interface in wine production and consumption. Geographic approaches include cultural history, global and localized political economies, cultural adaptation to climate, and physical geography. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 108, GEOG 109, GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 436 (3) Coastal Geomorphology
Geomorphic forms and processes along coasts; waves and currents; sediment transport mechanics; beach and nearshore morphodynamics; aeolian forms and processes. May include one or more required one-day weekend field trips. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 436 or EESC 436. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 222, GEOG 222, APSC 253.
Equivalency: EESC 436.
GEOG 437 (3) Terrain Analysis
Identification, mapping, and quantification of terrain morphologies in the field and from remote sensing following professional codes of practice. Twelve days of field instruction over a two week period following spring exams. Students must arrange own transportation to/from field locations. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 437 or EESC 437.
Prerequisite: One of EESC 222, GEOG 222, GEOG 317, ENGR 340. Third-year standing.
Equivalency: EESC 437.
GEOG 451 (3) Urban Planning
Urban and regional planning issues from a geographical perspective. Definition of community and its spatial expression in contemporary urban settings, institutional urban planning legislation, history of Canadian planning practice, contemporary urban and community planning practices, relationships between interests of community stakeholders and municipal decision-making process. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 454 (3) Geography of Housing
Topics focused on the Canadian city, including current housing markets, neighbourhood change, market failures and housing problems, social housing, and the role of government and policy. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 458 (3) Population Geography
The relationship between population growth, demographic changes, urbanization, and the environment. Demographic patterns, mortality, fertility and state policy, economic development, migration and immigration, planning, and policy issues. [3-0-0]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 466 (3) Soil Science
Physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils, soil formation and classification. Soil physics and water movement. Soil productivity, conservation, and sustainability. The application of soil science to land use, environmental quality, global change, and sustainable development. Credit will be granted for only one of GEOG 466 or EESC 456. [3-3-0]
Prerequisite: One of EESC 111, EESC 200, GEOG 109, CHEM 111, CHEM 121, PHYS 111, PHYS 112. Third-year standing.
Equivalency: EESC 456.
GEOG 473 (3) Cartography and Society
A study of the art, science, politics, and application of maps and map-making. Lectures contain a core social-theory component that explores the critical cartography discourse - the creation of maps to address issues of location, representation, and power. Seminars will debate contemporary issues in cartography. [2-0-1]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129, GEOG 272 and third-year standing.
GEOG 474 (3) Qualitative Research in Human Geography
Theoretical aspects, principles, and methods of qualitative research in human geography. [1-0-2]
Prerequisite: Third-year standing. GEOG 371 highly recommended.
GEOG 480 (3) Advanced Seminar in Critical Geography
Surveys a range of approaches to critical theory in human geography. Topics include theoretical approaches to understanding geographies of everyday life: feminism, postcolonialism, postmodernism, poststructuralism, and socialism. [0-0-3]
Prerequisite: All of GEOG 128, GEOG 129 and third-year standing.
GEOG 491 (3/9) d Selected Topics in Geography
Intensive examination of a selected geographical theme or region. Contact the Unit for more information. With different topics, the course can be taken more than once for credit.
Prerequisite: 6 credits of 300- or 400-level GEOG courses.
GEOG 498 (3-9) d Directed Studies in Geography
Students will undertake a supervised investigation which will result in a written report of the findings. The topic will be agreed upon by the supervising faculty member, the student, and the unit head.
Prerequisite: Third-year standing, and permission of the relevant unit head and the supervising faculty member.

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